Sunday, June 8, 2008

History of Coca-Cola


The world's most recognized trademark in the World!
It is recognized by 94% of the world's population.

The world has changed in many ways since pharmacist, John Styth Pemberton first introduced the refreshing taste of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Georgia. However, the pure and simple magic of one thing remains the same - Coca-Cola. The name and the product mean so many things to hundreds of millions of consumers around the globe. Coca-Cola products are served more than 705 million times every day, quenching the thirsts of consumers in more than 195 countries in every climate. That's a long way to come after such a modest beginning...

May 1886 - Pemberton concocted a caramel-colored syrup in a three-legged brass kettle in his backyard. He first "distributed" the new product by carrying Coca-Cola in a jug down the street to Jacobs Pharmacy. For five cents, consumers could enjoy a glass of Coca-Cola at the soda fountain. Whether by design or accident, carbonated water was teamed with the new syrup, producing a drink that was proclaimed "Delicious and Refreshing." Dr. Pemberton's partner and bookkeeper, Frank M. Robinson, suggested the name and penned, in the unique flowing script that is famous worldwide today, "".
1886 - Sales of Coca-Cola averaged nine drinks per day. That first year, Dr. Pemberton sold 25 gallons of syrup, shipped in bright red wooden kegs. Red has been a distinctive color associated with the No. 1 soft drink brand ever since.
1891 - Atlanta entrepreneur Asa G. Candler had acquired complete ownership of the Coca-Cola business. Pemberton was forced to sell because he was in a state of poor health and was in debt. He had paid $76.96 for advertising, but he only made $50.00 in profits. Candler acquired the whole company for $2,300. Within four years, Candler's merchandising flair helped expand consumption of Coca-Cola to every state and territory.
1893 - In January "Coca-Cola" was registered in the U.S. Patent office.
1894 - The first syrup plant outside of Atlanta was opened in Dallas.
1899 - Chandler's great achievement -- large scale bottling of Coca-Cola
1906 - The first two countries outside the United States to bottle Coca-Cola were Cuba and Panama
1915 - The Root Glass company created the Coca-Cola contour glass bottle.
1917 - 3 Million Coke's sold per day. "" is the worlds most recognized trademark.
1919 - The Coca-Cola Company was sold to a group of investors for $25 million.
1923 - The Coca-Cola Company was sold after the Prohibition Era to Ernest Woodruff for 25 million dollars. He gave Coca-Cola to his son, Robert Woodruff, who would be president for six decades.

Woodruff's leadership took the business to unrivaled heights of commercial success, making Coca-Cola an institution the world over. Woodruff was an influential man in Atlanta because of his contributions to area colleges, universities, businesses and organizations. When he made a contribution, he would never leave his name, this is how he became to be known as "Mr. Anonymous."

During the Woodruff era, Mr. Woodruff made a promise to the armed forces of the United States to supply Coca-Cola to every serviceperson. He said that costs and location did not matter, he supplied 5 billion bottles to the service.

Robert Woodruff did have one dubious distinction, he raised the syrup prices for distributors. But he improved efficiency at every step of the manufacturing process. Woodruff also increased productivity by improving the sales department, emphasizing quality control, and beginning large-scale advertising and promotional campaigns. Woodruff made Coke available in every state of the Union through the soda fountain. For all of these achievements he earned the name, "The Boss"

1923 - Woodruff introduced the six bottle carton
1925 - 6 Million Coke's sold per day.
1927 - The first Coca-Cola radio advertisement.
1928 - Sales of bottled Coca-Cola surpassed fountain sales for the first time.
1929 -
-
Coca-Cola was made available through vending machine
The Coca-Cola bell glass was made available
1931 - The Coke Santa was introduced as a Christmas promotion
1934
Johnny Weissmuller, and Olympic champion swimmer, and Maureen O'Sullivan, a motion-picture star, appeared on a metal serving tray for Coca-Cola.
1940 - Coke is bottled in over 40 countries.
1943
On June 29, an urgent cablegram arrived from General Dwight Eisenhower's Allied Headquarters in North Africa, requesting 10 Coca-Cola bottling plants to serve American servicemen overseas. Eventually, 64 plants were set up during WWII.
1950 - Advertising on on the television began. Currently Coca-Cola is advertised on over five hundred TV channels around the world.
1952 - "The Big Beverage", the first novel about Coca-Cola, was written by William T. Campbell.
1960 - The twelve ounce Coke can was introduced.
1961 - Sprite was introduced.
1971 - The song "I'd like to Buy the World a Coke" was released.
1977 - The Coca-Cola contour bottle was patented
1978 - The two liter bottle was introduced, and during that same year the company also introduced plastic bottles
1979 - Fifteen hundred employees moved to the new corporate headquarters in Atlanta located on North Avenue. The new corporate headquarters came to be known as "The Tower."
1982 - Diet Coke was introduced in July.
1985 - The Coca-Cola Company made what has been known as one of the biggest marketing blunder. They stumbled onto a new formula in efforts to produce diet Coke. They put forth 4 million dollars of research to come up with the new formula.

The decision to change their formula and pull the old Coke off the market came about because taste tests showed a distinct preference for the new formula. The new formula was a sweeter variation with less tang, it was also slightly smoother. Robert Woodruff's death was a large contributor to the change because he stated that he would never change Coca-Cola's formula. Another factor that influenced the change was that Coke's market share fell 2.5 percent in four years. Each percentage point lost or gain meant 200 million dollars. This was the first flavor change since the existence of the Coca-Cola company. The change was announced April 23, 1985 at the Vivian Beaumont Theater at the Lincoln Center. Some two hundred TV and newspaper reporters attended this very glitzy announcement. It included a question and answer session, and a history of Coca-Cola. The debut was accompanied by an advertising campaign that revived the Coca-Cola theme song of the early 1970s, "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke"

The change to the world's best selling soft drink was heard by 81 percent of the United States population within twenty-four hours of the announcement. Within a week of the change, one thousand calls a day were flooding the company's eight hundred number. Most of the callers were shocked and/or outraged, many said that they were considering switching to Pepsi. Within six weeks, the eight hundred number was being jammed by six thousand calls a day. The company also fielded over forty thousand letters, which were all answered and each person got a coupon for the new Coke. Many American consumers of Coca-Cola asked if they would have the final say. When Pepsi heard that the Coca-Cola company was changing its secret formula they said that it was a decision that Pepsi tastes better. Roger Enrico, the president and CEO of Pepsi-Cola wrote a letter to every major newspaper in the U.S. to declare the victory.

Coca-Cola management had to decide: Do nothing or "buy the world a new Coke". They decided to develop the new formula.


1985 - July 10, eighty-seven days after the new Coke was introduced, the old Coke was brought back in addition to the new one. This was greatly due to dropping market share and consumer protest. The market share fell from a high of 15 percent to a low of 1.4 percent. This was said to be a classic marketing retreat. Coca-Cola executives admitted that they had goofed by taking the old Coke off the market. The Coca-Cola company's eight hundred number received eighteen thousand calls of gratitude. One caller said they felt like a lost friend had returned home. The comeback of old Coke drove stock prices to the highest level in twelve years. This was said to be the only way to regain the lead on the cola wars.
1988 - Coca-Cola was the first independent operator in the Soviet Union.
1993 - Coca-Cola exceeds 10 Billion cases sold worldwide.
1993 - Advertising slogan -"Always Coca-Cola".
1995 - Coke was consumed aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery -- marking the third trip into space for Coca-Cola and the first for Diet Coke.
1996 - The Summer Olympics will be held in Atlanta, Georgia, the home of Coca-Cola.
For more than 65 years, Coca-Cola has been a sponsor of the Olympics.

One great earmark that the Coca-Cola Company has is helping the people of Atlanta. They accomplish this through scholarships, hotlines, donations and contributions. Another large accomplishment that the Coca-Cola has, is being the first company to make and use recycled plastic bottles. One way to see all of the achievements of the Coca-Cola company is to visit the World of Coke in Atlanta. It houses a collection of memorabilia, samples of the products, exhibits, and many other exciting items. All of what has been said is the basis of what Coca-Cola was built on. Without societies help, Coca-Cola could not have become over a 50 billion dollar business. Keep on consuming the world's favorite soft drink, Coca-Cola.

Until the 1960s, both small town and big city dwellers enjoyed carbonated beverages at the local soda fountain or ice cream saloon. Often housed in the drug store, the soda fountain counter served as a meeting place for people of all ages. Often combined with lunch counters, the soda fountain declined in popularity as commercial ice cream, bottled soft drinks, and fast food restaurants came to the fore.

  • The term "soda water" was first coined in 1798.

  • In 1810, the first U.S. patent was issued for the manufacture of imitation mineral waters.

  • The first soda fountain patent was granted to Samuel Fahnestock in 1819.

  • In 1858, G.D. Dows invented and operated the first marble soda fountain, which he patented in 1863.

  • In 1883, James W. Tufts patented a soda fountain, which he called the Arctic. Tufts went on to become a huge soda fountain manufacturer.

  • On January 25, 1870, Gustavus Dows patented a modern form of the soda fountain.

  • In October of 1874, Robert M. Green created the first ice cream soda.

  • In 1903, a revolution in soda fountain design took place with the front service fountain patented by Dr. Heisinger.



More fun facts and trivia

  • Coca-Cola can be used to bake a ham. Pour one can into the baking pan, rap the ham in aluminum foil, and bake. Thirty minutes before the ham has finished cooking, remove the foil, allowing the drippings to mix with the Coca-Cola to make a delicious brown gravy.

  • Mexico and Iceland have the highest per capita consumption of Coca-Cola.

  • Coca-Cola translated to Chinese means, "To make mouth happy".

  • Every second over 7,000 Coca-Cola products are consumed.

  • The tallest Coca-Cola bottling plants are in Hong Kong. The plant in Quarry Bay is 17 floors, and the plant in Shatin is 25 floors.

  • The bottling plant at the highest elevation in the world is located in Bolivia, at 12,000 feet.

  • The world's longest Coca-Cola truck is in Sweden. It is 79 feet long with a four-azle trailer.

  • The best selling non-carbonated soft drink in Japan is a product of The Coca-Cola Company named "Georgia", a coffee flavored beverage.

  • Coca-Cola first crossed the Atlantic on board the Graf Zeppelin, the German dirigible.

  • The Varsity Restaurant in Atlanta, Georgia, has earned the distinction of serving the highest volume of Coca-Cola anywhere. It dispenses nearly 3 million servings of Coca-Cola annually.

  • If the Coca-Cola company constructed a sign like the ones McDonald's uses to count their millions of customers, by 1983 it would have read "over 1 trillion served."

  • If all the Coca-Cola ...

    • ever produced were in 6 1/2 oz. bottles and placed end to end they would wrap around the earth more than 11,863 times.

    • sold in 1994 were in 8-ounce bottles laid end-to-end, those bottles would reach to the moon and back 76 times.

    • vending machines in the U.S. were stacked one on top of each other, the pile would be over 450 miles high.

    • ever produced were to erupt from "Old Faithful" at its normal rate of 14,000 gallons per hour, the geyser would flow continually for 1,577 years.

    • products sold in 1994 were flowing over Niagara Falls at its normal rate of 1.5 billion gallons per second, the falls would flow for three hours.

The Coca-Cola Company began bottling operations in ...
...

1907

in Hawaii.
...

1912

in the Philippines.
...

1920

in France.
...

1927

in Belgium, Bermuda, Colombia, Honduras, Italy, Mexico, Haiti and Burma.
...

1928

in Antigua, China, Guatemala, Holland, Spain, Venezuela, and the Dominican Republic.
...

1929

in Germany and Spanish Morocco.
...

1938

Australia, Austria, Gutana, Surinam, Jamaica, Curacao, Luxembourg, Norway, Scotland, South Africa, The Virgin Islands, and Trinidad.
...

1940

in Ecuador, and El Salvador.
...

1942

in Nicaragua, Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Iceland, and Uruguay.
...

1945

in Egypt, and Martinique
...

1946

in Barbados, Japan, and Okinawa
...

1947

in Morocco and Tangier
...

1948

in Liberia, Rhodesia, and Guadeloupe



Saturday, June 7, 2008

Sodium Benzoate

Sodium benzoate (E211), also called benzoate of soda, has chemical formula NaC6H5CO2. It is the sodium salt of benzoic acid and exists in this form when dissolved in water.

Sodium benzoate is a preservative. It is bacteriostatic and fungistatic under acidic conditions. It is used most prevalently in acidic foods such as salad dressings (vinegar), carbonated drinks (carbonic acid), jams and fruit juices (citric acid), pickles (vinegar), and Chinese food sauces (soy, mustard, and duck). It is also found in alcohol-based mouthwash and silver polish. Sodium benzoate is declared on a product label as 'sodium benzoate' or E211. The taste of sodium benzoate cannot be detected by around 25 percent of the population, but for those who can taste the chemical, it tends to be perceived as sweet, sour, salty, or sometimes bitter.

Blended Food Colours

EGG YELLOW VC 10
YOLK YELLOW VC 11
ORANGE RED VC 12
STRAWBERRY RED VC 13
ROSE PINK VC 14
RASPBERRY RED VC 15
GRAPE VC 16
VIOLET VC 17
COFFEE BROWN VC 18
CHOCOLATE BROWN VC 19
DARK CHOCOLATE VC 20
LIME GREEN VC 21
APPLE GREEN VC 22
PEA GREEN VC 23
BLACK CURRANT VC 24



LAKE QUINOLINE YELLOW
47005:1 E 104
LAKE TARTRAZINE
19140:1 E 102
LAKE SUNSET YELLOW FCF
15985:1 E 110
LAKE ERYTHROSINE
45430:1 E 127
LAKE PONCEAU 4R
16255:1 E 124
LAKE ALLURA RED
16035:1 E 129
LAKE CARMOISINE
14720:1 E 128
LAKE AMARANTH
16185:1 E 123
LAKE CHOCCOLATE BROWN HT
20285:1
E 155
LAKE BRILLIANT BLUE FCF
42090:1 E 133
LAKE INDIGO CARMINE
73015:1 E 132

Synthetic Food Colours


Synthetic food colours, also known as artificial food colours, are manufactured chemically and are the most commonly used dyes in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.








Product/Colour Shade C.I.No. F.D. & C.No E.No.
QUINOLINE YELLOW 47005 - E 104
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
TARTRAZINE 19140 Yellow 5 E 102
( Tri sodium salt of 5-hydroxy (1-p-sulphophenyl 4- ( p-sulphophenylazo) pyrazol -3- carboxylicacid
SUNSET YELLOW FCF 15985 Yellow 6 E 110
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
ERYTHROSINE 45430 Red 3 E 127
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
PONCEAU 4R 16255 - E 124
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
ALLURA RED 16035 Red 40 E 129
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
CARMOISINE 14720 - E 122
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
AMARANTH 16185 Red 2 E 123
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
CHOCOLATE BROWN HT 20285 - E 155
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
BRILLIANT BLUE FCF 42090 Blue 1 E 133
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
PATENT BLUE V 42015 - E 131
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
INDIGO CARMINE 73015 Blue 2 E 132
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
BLACK PN 28440 - E 151
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
FAST RED E 16045 - -
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
GREEN S 44090 - E 142
( Di sodium salt of disulfonates of 2-(2quinolyl) - 1, 3 indandione.)
RED 2G 18050 - E 128

( Di sodium salt of 8-actamido-1-hydroxy-2- phenylazonaphthalene-3,6 disulponate)

Natural Food Colours

Natural food colours are the dyes, pigments or any other substances obtained from vegetable, animal, mineral, or source capable of colouring food drug, cosmetic or any part of human body, colours come from variety of sources such as seeds, fruits, vegetables, algae & insect. According to the application a suitable Natural Colour can be achieved by keeping in mind the factors such as PH. heat, light storage and the other ingredients of the formula or recipe. The stirage conditions for natural colours depends on the particular need of the product.

A tight sealed container is best to store he product in a cool storage to preserve colour strength and quality, along with its degree of cooling point. r customer specifications.



Colour
PRODUCTS
SPECS
C I Nos
E E C. Nos
Annatto Colour Oil Soluble
75120
E-160b
Annatto Colour, Water Soluble
75120
E-160b
Annatto Bixin Powder
75120
E-160b
Annatto Nor Bixin Powder
75120
E-160b
Annatto Colour, Acid Proof
75120
E-160b
Beet Root Red colour
-
E-162b
Curcumin Yellow Colour
75300
E-100
Caramel Colour Liquid
-
-
Caramel Colour Powder
-
E-150
Paprika Colour
-
E-160c
Anthocyanin Colour
-
E-163
Chlorophyll Green Colour Water Soluble
75810
E-141
Chlorophyll Green Colour Oil Soluble
75810
E-141
Safflower Extract/Carthamus
75760
-

NATURAL COLOUR EEC NO. DESCRIPTION
Annatto E160b Liquid/Powder (os)


LIQUID / POWDER (WS)
Turmeric E100 Paste, 35% Curcumin


Liquid (Os) Up To 12% Curcumin


Liquid (Ws) Up To 10% Curcumin


Powder, Up To 95% Curcumin
COCHINEAL / E 120 Powder, N.L.T. 50% Carminic Acid
Carmini
Powder, 30% - 95% Carminic Acid


Powder Up To 40% Carminic Acid


Liquid (Ws) 2% - 10% Carminic Acid
Paprika E 160c Liquid (Os) 10,000 To 1,60,000 Cu


Liquid (Ws) 10,000 To 50,000 Cu


Powder, Spray Dried
Anthocyanins E 163 Liquid / Powder (Ws)


Liquid / Powder (Ws)


Liquid / Powder (Ws)
Beta Carotenes / E 160a Powder (Ws) Up To 7.5% Mix Carotenes
Carotenoids
Liquid (Os) Up To 2.5% Mix Carotenes
Gardenia
Liquid (Ws)
Gardenia
Liquid (Ws)
Gardenia
Liquid (Ws)
Iron Oxides E 172 Powder
Iron Oxides E 172 Powder
Iron Oxides E 172 Powder
Iron Oxides E 172 Powder
Marigold Extract / E 161b Paste (Os) Up To 10% Xanthophylls
Lutein
Powder Up To 50% Lutein
Chlorophyll E 140 Liquid Ws / Os

E 141 Liquid Ws / Os - Powder Ws
Titanium Dioxide E 172 Powder & Paste Ws & Od
Carbon Black E 153 Powder, Paste, Emulsion In Oil
Beet Root E 162 Liquid / Powder (Ws)
Safflower - Liquid / Powder (Ws)
Caramel E 150 Liquid / Powder (Ws)

a,b,c,d
Lycopene E 160d 0s .2 To 20%
Monascus
Liquid / Powder (Ws)
Red Cabbage
Powder
Raddish
Powder







Citric Acid


Citric acid is a weak organic acid. It is a natural preservative and is also used to add an acidic, or sour, taste to foods and soft drinks. In biochemistry, it is important as an intermediate in the citric acid cycle and therefore occurs in the metabolism of almost all living things. It also serves as an environmentally benign cleaning agent and acts as an antioxidant.

Citric acid exists in a variety of fruits and vegetables, most notably citrus fruits. Lemons and limes have particularly high concentrations of the acid; it can comprise as much as 8% of the dry weight of these fruits (1.44 and 1.38 grams per ounce of the juices, respectively).

Citric acid has been used as an additive to soft drinks, beer, and seltzer, and occurs naturally in many juices. This causes a problem in measurement because the standard measuring technique for sugar is refractive index. The refractive index of sugar and citric acid is almost identical. For soft drinks and orange juice the best measure of sweetness is the sugar/acid ratio. Recently, the use of infrared sensors has allowed measurement of both Brix (sugar content) and acidity by detecting sugars and citric acid through their characteristic molecular vibrations; this gives an accurate assessment of a drink's sweetness.

As a food additive, citric acid is used as a flavouring and preservative in food and beverages, especially soft drinks. It is denoted by E number E330. Citrate salts of various metals are used to deliver those minerals in a biologically available form in many dietary supplements. The buffering properties of citrates are used to control pH in household cleaners and pharmaceuticals.

Flavour


Flavor or flavour is the sensory impression of a food or other substance, and is determined mainly by the chemical senses of taste and smell. The "trigeminal senses", which detect chemical irritants in the mouth and throat, may also occasionally determine flavor. The flavor of the food, as such, can be altered with natural or artificial flavorants, which affect these senses.

Flavorant is defined as a substance that gives another substance flavor, altering the characteristics of the solute, causing it to become sweet, sour, tangy, etc.

Of the three chemical senses, smell is the main determinant of a food item's flavor. While the taste of food is limited to sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and savory (umami)--the basic tastes--the smells of a food are potentially limitless. A food's flavor, therefore, can be easily altered by changing its smell while keeping its taste similar. Nowhere is this better exemplified than in artificially flavored jellies, soft drinks and candies, which, while made of bases with a similar taste, have dramatically different flavors due to the use of different scents or fragrances.

Although the terms "flavoring" or "flavorant" in common language denote the combined chemical sensations of taste and smell, the same terms are usually used in the fragrance and flavors industry to refer to edible chemicals and extracts that alter the flavor of food and food products through the sense of smell. Due to the high cost or unavailability of natural flavor extracts, most commercial flavorants are nature-identical, which means that they are the chemical equivalent of natural flavors but chemically synthesized rather than being extracted from the source materials.


  • Natural flavouring substances: Flavouring substances obtained from plant or animal raw materials, by physical, microbiological or enzymatic processes. They can be either used in their natural state or processed for human consumption, but cannot contain any nature-identical or artificial flavouring substances.

  • Nature-identical flavouring substances: Flavouring substances that are obtained by synthesis or isolated through chemical processes, which are chemically identical to flavouring substances naturally present in products intended for human consumption. They cannot contain any artificial flavouring substances.

  • Artificial flavouring substances: Flavouring substances not identified in a natural product intended for human consumption, whether or not the product is processed.

Most food and beverage companies do not create their own flavors but instead employ the services of a flavour company. Food and beverage companies may require flavors for new products, product line extensions (e.g., low fat versions of existing products) or due to changes in formula or processing for existing products.

The flavor creation is done by a specially trained scientist called a "Flavourist". Flavourist's job combines extensive scientific knowledge of the chemical palette wit$h artistic creativity to develop new and distinctive flavors. The flavor creation begins when the flavorist receives a brief from the client. In the brief the client will attempt to communicate exactly what type of flavor they seek, in what application it will be used, and any special requirements (e.g., must be all natural). The communication barrier can be quite difficult to overcome since most people aren't experienced at describing flavors. The flavorist will use his or her knowledge of the available chemical ingredients to create a formula and compound it on an electronic balance. The flavor will then be submitted to the client for testing. Several iterations, with feedback from the client, may be needed before the right flavor is found.

Additional work may also be done by the flavor company. For example, the flavor company may conduct sensory taste tests to test consumer acceptance of a flavor before it is sent to the client or to further investigate the "sensory space." The flavor company may also employ application specialists who work to ensure the flavor will work in the application for which it is intended. This may require special flavor delivery technologies that are used to protect the flavor during processing or cooking so that the flavor is only released when eaten by the end consumer.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Health effects of drinking Soda

Sparkling mineral water is a negligible cause of dental erosion. While the dissolution potential of sparkling water is greater than still water, levels remain low: by comparison, soft drinks cause tooth decay at a rate of several hundred times that of regular sparkling water. De-gassing of a sparkling mineral water reduces its dissolution potential, but the total levels are still relatively low, suggesting that carbonation of drinks may not be an important factor per se in causing dental erosion.

Intake of carbonated beverages has not been associated with increased bone fracture risk in observational studies, and the net effect of carbonated beverage constituents on the amount of calcium in the body is negligible, leaving carbonated water as harmless as regular water.

History of Carbonated water (Soda)

Joseph Priestley first discovered a method of impregnating water with carbon dioxide when he suspended a bowl of water above a beer vat at a local brewery in Leeds, England. The air blanketing the fermenting beer—called 'fixed air'—was known to kill mice suspended in it. Priestley found water thus treated had a pleasant taste and he offered it to friends as a refreshing drink. In 1772 Priestley published a paper entitled Impregnating Water with Fixed Air in which he describes dripping oil of vitriol (or sulfuric acid as it is now called) onto chalk to produce carbon dioxide gas, and encouraging the gas to dissolve into an agitated bowl of water.

In 1771 Swedish chemistry professor Torbern Bergman independently invented a similar process to make carbonated water. In poor health at the time yet frugal, he was trying to reproduce naturally-effervescent spring waters thought at the time to be beneficial to health.

Today, carbonated water is made by passing pressurized carbon dioxide through water. The pressure increases the solubility and allows more carbon dioxide to dissolve than would be possible under standard atmospheric pressure. When the bottle is opened, the pressure is released, allowing the gas to come out of the solution, thus forming the characteristic bubbles.

In the US, Carbonated water was commonly known by the name of soda water until World War II. In the 1950's new terms such as sparkling water and seltzer water began to be used. The term seltzer water is a genericized trademark that comes from the German brand Selters, which is produced and bottled in Nieder-Selters, Germany.

Flavored carbonated water is also commercially available. It differs from sodas in that it contains flavors (usually fruit flavors such as lemon, lime, orange, or raspberry) but no sugar.

Carbonated Water

Carbonated water, also known as sparkling water, is plain water into which carbon dioxide gas has been dissolved, and is the major and defining component of most "soft drinks". The process of dissolving carbon dioxide gas is called carbonation. It results in the formation of carbonic acid (which has the chemical formula H2CO3).

In the past, soda water was produced in the home by "charging" a refillable seltzer bottle by filling it with water and then adding carbon dioxide. Club soda may be identical to plain carbonated water or it may contain a small amount of table salt, sodium citrate, sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, potassium sulfate, or disodium phosphate, depending on the bottler. These additives are included to emulate the slightly salty taste of homemade soda water. The process can also occur naturally to produce carbonated mineral water.

Uses of Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is used to produce carbonated soft drinks and soda water. Traditionally, the carbonation in beer and sparkling wine comes about through natural fermentation, but some manufacturers carbonate these drinks artificially. A candy called Pop Rocks is pressurized with carbon dioxide gas at about 40 bar (600 psi). When placed in the mouth, it dissolves (just like other hard candy) and releases the gas bubbles with an audible pop.

Carbon dioxide is used by the food industry, the oil industry, and the chemical industry. It is used in many consumer products that require pressurized gas because it is inexpensive and nonflammable, and because it undergoes a phase transition from gas to liquid at room temperature at an attainable pressure of approximately 60 bar (870 psi, 59 atm), allowing far more carbon dioxide to fit in a given container than otherwise would. Life jackets often contain canisters of pressured carbon dioxide for quick inflation. Aluminum capsules are also sold as supplies of compressed gas for airguns, paintball markers, for inflating bicycle tires, and for making seltzer. Rapid vaporization of liquid carbon dioxide is used for blasting in coal mines. High concentrations of carbon dioxide can also be used to kill pests, such as the Common Clothes Moth.


Leavening agents produce carbon dioxide to cause dough to rise. Baker's yeast produces carbon dioxide by fermentation of sugars within the dough, while chemical leaveners such as baking powder and baking soda release carbon dioxide when heated or if exposed to acids.


A carbon dioxide laser.Carbon dioxide is the most commonly used compressed gas for pneumatic systems in portable pressure tools and combat robots.

Carbon dioxide extinguishes flames, and some fire extinguishers, especially those designed for electrical fires, contain liquid carbon dioxide under pressure. Carbon dioxide also finds use as an atmosphere for welding, although in the welding arc, it reacts to oxidize most metals. Use in the automotive industry is common despite significant evidence that welds made in carbon dioxide are brittler than those made in more inert atmospheres, and that such weld joints deteriorate over time because of the formation of carbonic acid. It is used as a welding gas primarily because it is much less expensive than more inert gases such as argon or helium.

Liquid carbon dioxide is a good solvent for many lipophilic organic compounds, and is used to remove caffeine from coffee. First, the green coffee beans are soaked in water. The beans are placed in the top of a column seventy feet (21 meters) high. The carbon dioxide fluid at about 93 degrees Celsius enters at the bottom of the column. The caffeine diffuses out of the beans and into the carbon dioxide.

Carbon dioxide has begun to attract attention in the pharmaceutical and other chemical processing industries as a less toxic alternative to more traditional solvents such as organochlorides. It's used by some dry cleaners for this reason.

Plants require carbon dioxide to conduct photosynthesis, and greenhouses may enrich their atmospheres with additional CO2 to boost plant growth, since its low present-day atmosphere concentration is just above the "suffocation" level for green plants. A photosynthesis-related drop in carbon dioxide concentration in a greenhouse compartment can kill green plants. At high concentrations, carbon dioxide is toxic to animal life, so raising the concentration to 10,000 ppm (1%) for several hours can eliminate pests such as whiteflies and spider mites in a greenhouse.

It has been proposed that carbon dioxide from power generation be bubbled into ponds to grow algae that could then be converted into biodiesel fuel. In medicine, up to 5% carbon dioxide is added to pure oxygen for stimulation of breathing after apnea and to stabilize the O2/CO2 balance in blood.

A common type of industrial gas laser is the carbon dioxide laser.

Carbon dioxide can also be combined with limonene oxide from orange peels or other epoxides to create polymers and plastics.

Carbon dioxide is used in enhanced oil recovery where it is injected into or adjacent to producing oil wells, usually under supercritical conditions. It acts as both a pressurizing agent and, when dissolved into the underground crude oil, significantly reduces its viscosity, enabling the oil to flow more rapidly through the earth to the removal well. In mature oil fields, extensive pipe networks are used to carry the carbon dioxide to the injection points.

In the chemical industry, carbon dioxide is used for the production of urea, carbonates and bicarbonates, and sodium salicylate.

Liquid and solid carbon dioxide are important refrigerants, especially in the food industry, where they are employed during the transportation and storage of ice cream and other frozen foods. Solid carbon dioxide is called "dry ice" and is used for small shipments where refrigeration equipment is not practical.

Liquid carbon dioxide (industry nomenclature R744 / R-744) was used as a refrigerant prior to the discovery of R-12 and is likely to enjoy a renaissance due to environmental concerns. Its physical properties are highly favorable for cooling, refrigeration, and heating purposes, having a high volumetric cooling capacity. Due to its operation at pressures of up to 130 bars, CO2 systems require highly resistant components that have been already developed to serial production in many sectors. In car air conditioning, in more than 90% of all driving conditions, R744 operates more efficiently than systems using R-134a. Its environmental advantages (GWP of 1, non-ozone depleting, non-toxic, non-flammable) could make it the future working fluid to replace current HFCs in cars, supermarkets, hot water heat pumps, among others. Some applications: Coca-Cola has fielded CO2-based beverage coolers and the US Army is interested in CO2 refrigeration and heating technology.

By the end of 2007, the global car industry is expected to decide on the next-generation refrigerant in car air conditioning. CO2 is one discussed option.

Enhanced Coal Bed Methane recovery (ECBM) is the process whereby carbon dioxide is pumped into the coal seam to displace methane thanks to higher CO2 adsorptivity.

Toxicity of Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide content in fresh air varies between 0.03% (300 ppm) and 0.06% (600 ppm), depending on the location (see graphical map of CO2 in real-time).

A person's exhaled breath is approximately 4.5% carbon dioxide by volume.

Adaptation to increased levels of CO2 occurs in humans. Continuous inhalation of CO2 can be tolerated at three percent inspired concentrations for at least one month and four percent inspired concentrations for over a week. It was suggested that 2.0 percent inspired concentrations could be used for closed air spaces (ex. Submarine) since the adaptation is physiological and reversible. Decrement in performance or in normal physical activity does not happen at this level.

It is dangerous when inhaled in high concentrations (greater than 5% by volume, or 50,000 ppm). The current threshold limit value (TLV) or maximum level that is considered safe for healthy adults for an eight-hour work day is 0.5% (5,000 ppm). The maximum safe level for infants, children, the elderly and individuals with cardio-pulmonary health issues is significantly less.

These figures are valid for pure carbon dioxide. In indoor spaces occupied by people the carbon dioxide concentration will reach higher levels than in pure outdoor air. Concentrations higher than 1,000 ppm will cause discomfort in more than 20% of occupants, and the discomfort will increase with increasing CO2 concentration. The discomfort will be caused by various gases coming from human respiration and perspiration, and not by CO2 itself. At 2,000 ppm the majority of occupants will feel a significant degree of discomfort, and many will develop nausea and headaches. The CO2 concentration between 300 and 2,500 ppm is used as an indicator of indoor air quality.

Acute carbon dioxide toxicity is sometimes known as by the names given to it by miners: blackdamp (also called choke damp or stythe). Miners would try to alert themselves to dangerous levels of carbon dioxide in a mine shaft by bringing a caged canary with them as they worked. The canary would inevitably die before CO2 reached levels toxic to people. Carbon dioxide caused a great loss of life at Lake Nyos in Cameroon in 1986, when an upwelling of CO2-laden lake water quickly blanketed a large surrounding populated area. The heavier carbon dioxide forced out the life-sustaining oxygen near the surface, killing nearly two thousand people.

Carbon dioxide ppm levels (CDPL) are a surrogate for measuring indoor pollutants that may cause occupants to grow drowsy, get headaches, or function at lower activity levels. To eliminate most Indoor Air Quality complaints, total indoor CDPL must be reduced to below 600. NIOSH considers that indoor air concentrations that exceed 1,000 are a marker suggesting inadequate ventilation. ASHRAE recommends they not exceed 1,000 inside a space. OSHA limits concentrations in the workplace to 5,000 for prolonged periods. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health limits brief exposures (up to ten minutes) to 30,000 and considers CDPL exceeding 40,000 as "immediately dangerous to life and health." People who breathe 50,000 for more than half an hour show signs of acute hypercapnia, while breathing 70,000 – 100,000 can produce unconsciousness in only a few minutes. Accordingly, carbon dioxide, either as a gas or as dry ice, should be handled only in well-ventilated areas.

Carbon dioxide Manufacture

Carbon dioxide is manufactured mainly from six processes


1. As a byproduct in ammonia and hydrogen plants, where methane is converted to CO2;

2. From combustion of wood and fossil fuels;

3. As a byproduct of fermentation of sugar in the brewing of beer, whisky and other alcoholic beverages;

4. From thermal decomposition of limestone, CaCO3, in the manufacture of lime, CaO;

5. As a byproduct of sodium phosphate manufacture;

6. Directly from natural carbon dioxide springs, where it is produced by the action of acidified water on limestone or dolomite.

Isolation of Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide may be obtained from air distillation. However, this yields only very small quantities of CO2. A large variety of chemical reactions yield carbon dioxide, such as the reaction between most acids and most metal carbonates. For example, the reaction between sulfuric acid and calcium carbonate (limestone or chalk) is depicted below:

H2SO4 + CaCO3 → CaSO4 + H2CO3

The H2CO3 then decomposes to water and CO2. Such reactions are accompanied by foaming or bubbling, or both. In industry such reactions are widespread because they can be used to neutralize waste acid streams.

The production of quicklime (CaO) a chemical that has widespread use, from limestone by heating at about 850 °C also produces CO2:

CaCO3 → CaO + CO2

The combustion of all carbon containing fuels, such as methane (natural gas), petroleum distillates (gasoline, diesel, kerosene, propane), but also of coal and wood, will yield carbon dioxide and, in most cases, water. As an example the chemical reaction between methane and oxygen is given below.

CH4 + 2 O2 → CO2 + 2 H2O

Iron is reduced from its oxides with coke in a blast furnace, producing pig iron and carbon dioxide:

2 Fe2O3 + 3 C → 4 Fe + 3 CO2

Yeast metabolizes sugar to produce carbon dioxide and ethanol, also known as alcohol, in the production of wines, beers and other spirits:

C6H12O6 → 2 CO2 + 2 C2H5OH

All aerobic organisms produce CO2 when they oxidize carbohydrates, fatty acids, and proteins in the mitochondria of cells. The large number of reactions involved are exceedingly complex and not described easily. Refer to (cellular respiration, anaerobic respiration and photosynthesis). Photoautotrophs (i.e. plants, cyanobacteria) use another modus operandi: Plants absorb CO2 from the air, and, together with water, react it to form carbohydrates:

nCO2 + nH2O → (CH2O)n + nO2

Carbon dioxide is soluble in water, in which it spontaneously interconverts between CO2 and H2CO3 (carbonic acid). The relative concentrations of CO2, H2CO3, and the deprotonated forms HCO3− (bicarbonate) and CO32−(carbonate) depend on the pH. In neutral or slightly alkaline water (pH > 6.5), the bicarbonate form predominates (>50%) becoming the most prevalent (>95%) at the pH of seawater, while in very alkaline water (pH > 10.4) the predominant (>50%) form is carbonate. The bicarbonate and carbonate forms are very soluble, such that air-equilibrated ocean water (mildly alkaline with typical pH = 8.2 – 8.5) contains about 120 mg of bicarbonate per liter.

History of Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide was one of the first gases to be described as a substance distinct from air. In the seventeenth century, the Flemish chemist Jan Baptist van Helmont observed that when he burned charcoal in a closed vessel, the mass of the resulting ash was much less than that of the original charcoal. His interpretation was that the rest of the charcoal had been transmuted into an invisible substance he termed a "gas" or "wild spirit" (spiritus sylvestre).

The properties of carbon dioxide were studied more thoroughly in the 1750s by the Scottish physician Joseph Black. He found that limestone (calcium carbonate) could be heated or treated with acids to yield a gas he called "fixed air." He observed that the fixed air was denser than air and did not support either flame or animal life. He also found that when bubbled through an aqueous solution of lime (calcium hydroxide), it would precipitate calcium carbonate. He used this phenomenon to illustrate that carbon dioxide is produced by animal respiration and microbial fermentation. In 1772, English chemist Joseph Priestley published a paper entitled Impregnating Water with Fixed Air in which he described a process of dripping sulfuric acid (or oil of vitriol as Priestley knew it) on chalk in order to produce carbon dioxide, and forcing the gas to dissolve by agitating a bowl of water in contact with the gas.

Carbon dioxide was first liquefied (at elevated pressures) in 1823 by Humphry Davy and Michael Faraday. The earliest description of solid carbon dioxide was given by Charles Thilorier, who in 1834 opened a pressurized container of liquid carbon dioxide, only to find that the cooling produced by the rapid evaporation of the liquid yielded a "snow" of solid CO2.

Chemical & Physical properties of Carbon dioxide


Carbon dioxide is a colorless, odorless gas. When inhaled at concentrations much higher than usual atmospheric levels, it can produce a sour taste in the mouth and a stinging sensation in the nose and throat. These effects result from the gas dissolving in the mucous membranes and saliva, forming a weak solution of carbonic acid. This sensation can also occur during an attempt to stifle a burp after drinking a carbonated beverage. Amounts above 5,000 ppm are considered very unhealthy, and those above about 50,000 ppm (equal to 5% by volume) are considered dangerous to animal life.

At standard temperature and pressure, the density of carbon dioxide is around 1.98 kg/m³, about 1.5 times that of air. The carbon dioxide molecule (O=C=O) contains two double bonds and has a linear shape. It has no electrical dipole, and as it is fully oxidized, it is moderately reactive and is non-flammable, but will support the combustion of metals such as magnesium.

At −78.51° C or -109.3° F, carbon dioxide changes directly from a solid phase to a gaseous phase through sublimation, or from gaseous to solid through deposition. Solid carbon dioxide is normally called "dry ice", a generic trademark. It was first observed in 1825 by the French chemist Charles Thilorier. Dry ice is commonly used as a cooling agent, and it is relatively inexpensive. A convenient property for this purpose is that solid carbon dioxide sublimes directly into the gas phase leaving no liquid. It can often be found in grocery stores and laboratories, and it is also used in the shipping industry. The largest non-cooling use for dry ice is blast cleaning.

Liquid carbon dioxide forms only at pressures above 5.1 atm; the triple point of carbon dioxide is about 518 kPa at −56.6 °C (See phase diagram, above). The critical point is 7.38 MPa at 31.1 °C.[3]

An alternative form of solid carbon dioxide, an amorphous glass-like form, is possible, although not at atmospheric pressure.[4] This form of glass, called carbonia, was produced by supercooling heated CO2 at extreme pressure (40–48 GPa or about 400,000 atmospheres) in a diamond anvil. This discovery confirmed the theory that carbon dioxide could exist in a glass state similar to other members of its elemental family, like silicon (silica glass) and germanium. Unlike silica and germania glasses, however, carbonia glass is not stable at normal pressures and reverts back to gas when pressure is released.